Workshops

CAADRIA 2017: Protocols, Flows and Glitches

Workshop one

Workflows for Computational Environmental Design - Revit and Dynamo

2-3 April, with one coordination meeting at 5pm 1 April

Tutor

Suleiman Alhadidi (BVN architects, University of New South Wales)

This workshop provides concepts and techniques on how to visually script in Revit using Dynamo, it focuses on environmental design processes and concepts used to evaluate important concepts of sun orientation, building openings as well as shading devices. This design focused workshop will target basic parametric knowledge which is needed to connect data generated from the analysis tools, created in this workshop, with designed building components. It also provides insights on how to use computational design during sun studies to enrich BIM workflows. It provides participants with an understanding of how to approach BIM as an environmental design platform to assess building envelops. The workshop will open doors to experts in environmental design to enrich their explorations in sun related studies within Revit environment. Topics such as environmental planning regulation, and vertical and horizontal shading devices will be discussed from a parametric design perspective. The workshop will kick off your explorations on data driven design and analysis through creating environmentally smart building components.

Participation requirements

Basic knowledge in Revit/Dynamo, introduction videos for self-study before the workshop can be provided

Software requirements for working on own laptop

Revit (English version), latest release of Dynamo

Maximum of 20 participants

To register for the workshop, please send an email to caadria2017@gmail.com with the subject “workshop 1 sign-up”.

Workshop two

Participatory digital heritage portal within a game engine: a workflow for creation and sharing of information and narratives Contextualised Digital Heritage Workshop – Suzhou

2-3 April, with one coordination meeting at 5pm 1 April

Tutors

Danilo di Mascio (Northumbria University) and Marc A. Schnabel (Victoria University of Wellington) with support from Glen Wash (Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University)

One of the main points that characterises built heritage compared to contemporary constructions is the strong connection with a specific physical and cultural context. For this reason, the main idea that underlies this workshop is linked with a contextualised practical exercise (Di Mascio et al 2016). Built heritage represents a precious material and cultural resource to be studied and preserved for present and future generations.

However, despite its recognised importance, it is increasingly at risk from: conflicts, pollution, lack of maintenance and consequent abandonment. Raising peoples’ interest and comprehension of built heritage represents one way of enjoying and preserving it. Advances in digital technologies open up alternative and new possibilities in the documentation, study, communication and dissemination of tangible and intangible features of built heritage: this field of study is identified as Digital Heritage. Digital technologies can improve people’s engagement in digital heritage activities, supporting the creation and sharing of information, personal experiences and interpretations (such as notes, sketches, pictures, audio files, videos), from both professionals and laypeople.

This event proposes a brief scenario documentation, interpretation, and sharing and dissemination of heritage information and personal experiences, such as narratives. The proposed workflow will allow participants to create a portal of people’s information and experiences in the form of a 3d navigable environment within a game engine and populate it with a variety of information. Within this virtual environment, users will be able to experience the 3d virtual heritage, interact with and enjoy the user-generated content spread around it in a playful and more engaging way.

This workshop continues and merges the paths started by two successful workshops held during the previous eCAADe (Oulu, Finland) and CAADRIA conferences (Melbourne, Australia). The event will represent a place to share constructive and polyvalent discussions on how to create and share information and personal experiences along a digital heritage workflow.

Participation requirements

Everyone (students included) whose research or study area is focused on Digital Heritage and related topics is welcome to participate.

Software requirements for working on own laptop

Participants are required to bring a personal laptop to support the practical exercise. Further information about the required software packages will be sent via email to the participants.

Maximum of 15 participants.

To register for the workshop, please send an email to caadria2017@gmail.com with the subject “workshop 2 sign-up”.

Workshop three

A Novel Strategy of Environmental Performance-driven Building Design with Wind Tunnel and CFD Simulation

2-3 April, with one coordination meeting at 5pm 1 April

Tutors

Jiawei Yao (Tongji University), Jingyun Zheng (Tongji University), Philip F. Yuan (Tongji University)

Environmental performance simulation conducted in the early design stage can help architects understand the relationship between building geometry and the resulting aerodynamic effects both qualitatively and quantitatively. In this way, architects are able to make more responsible decisions. This workshop aims to encourage participants to understand and start to apply physical wind tunnel and digital CFD tools to guide urban and building design during the early design phase, while making environmental performance the driving force of building arrangement and generation.

Firstly, the basic theory about the interactive effect between outdoor airflow and buildings will be introduced. Then, a series of conceptual building arrangement design will be proposed according to nine-rectangle-grid. After that, the aerodynamic effects of different building combination patterns using custom-made mini wind tunnel and CFD software will be studied. Furthermore, multiple sets of experiments will be conducted with controlling parameters of building arrangement and height in nine-rectangle-grid (3*3).

Participation requirements

Basic knowledge in Rhino and Grasshopper

Software requirements for working on own laptop

Rhino and Grasshopper (latest versions)

Maximum of 15 participants.

To register for the workshop, please send an email to caadria2017@gmail.com with the subject “workshop 3 sign-up”.

Workshop four

Workflows for Conceptual Architectural Design Optimisation (ADO)

2-3 April, with one coordination meeting at 5pm 1 April

Tutors

Aloysius Lian (Advanced Architecture Laboratory, Singapore University of Technology and Design), Zuardin Akbar (Advanced Architecture Laboratory, Singapore University of Technology and Design), Thomas Wortmann (Advanced Architecture Laboratory, Singapore University of Technology and Design), Judyta Cichocka (Parametric Support)

The workshop will explore applications of mathematical optimisation to architectural design. Participants will learn about major classes of black-box optimisation algorithms—Metaheuristics (including Swarm Intelligence), Direct Search and Surrogate Model-based Optimisation—and experiment with algorithms from each category: Genetic Algorithms, Particle Swarm Optimisation, DIRECT, and optimisation with Radial Basis Functions. Participants will use state-of-the-art optimisation tools in Grasshopper and test them on benchmark problems. In a second step, they will develop customised optimisation objectives and workflows and apply them to a predefined parametric geometry. Participants also are encouraged to bring optimisation problems from their own practices and research to the workshop. The objective of this workshop is to provide participants with both the conceptual background and technical skills required to integrate optimisation into their architectural practice and research. The workshop will yield benchmark results for the test problems and provide examples of how different formulations of optimisation objectives can inform conceptual architectural design processes.

Participation requirements

Participants should be familiar with Rhinoceros, and have a basic knowledge of Grasshopper.

Software requirements for working on own laptop

Software (free unless indicated otherwise):

  • Rhinoceros 5 (30-day free evaluation)
  • Grasshopper3d 0.90076
  • Optimisation solvers: Galapagos, Silvereye, Goat, Opossum, Octopus
  • Analysis: DIVA (free educational license), Ladybug, Karamba (free version with limited functionality, full licenses subject to availability)

Maximum of 15 participants.

To register for the workshop, please send an email to caadria2017@gmail.com with the subject “workshop 4 sign-up”.

Workshop five

Programming Soundscape

1-3 April, with one coordination meeting at 5pm 1 April

Tutors

Yunying Chiu (Mecanoo), Yuya Hosomi (CAD developer)

In our times computational design plays a significant role in the way architecture is being conceived and constructed. The implementation of such processes in architecture changes the way we perceive design and influences tremendously the prediction of building realisation and the performance of the building.

Sound, as an invisible vibration which is transmitted from the building exterior envelope to interior and vice versa, is mostly considered to be controlled to improve building acoustics and solve building sound problems. If sound, as environmental parameters(from nature, human, society, mechanism, indicators), could be analysed and converted into visible mathematical databases, what can we apply on architecture in computational way? Chladni's best-known achievements was inventing a technique to show the various modes of vibration of a rigid surface, which had answered our question. Based on the practical experiences of designing the acoustic panels for rehearsal rooms in Wei-Wu-Ying centre for the arts (WWY) in Taiwan, we would like to ask if sounds that forms or arises from an immersive environment could be stored as an architectural object? If we can read the sound as a visible solid object from architecture? When architectural acoustic not just focused on good quality of sound performance, but also the sound-transformed object consisted by time, space and human history.

Our point of interest lies in considering the sound as a visible body which we try to inform and implement computationally. Our tool is programming, particularly customised commands in computer software which is based on mathematical subdivision of geometry, and 3D modelling for further tiling and connects to fabrication and laser cutting. Through coding we use the databases derived from sound, subdivide recursively and in different patterns platonic solids. We update this process based on folding techniques and our intuitive experience with such techniques. Our aim is to explore the possibilities and limitations of sound visualisation with computational tool and thinking.

Participation requirements

Anyone who is enthusiastic about architectural acoustics, geometric programming, subdivision and folding. Basic Rhino knowledge.

Software requirements for working on own laptop

Participants should have Rhino 5 and Processing 3 installed.

Maximum of 15 participants.

To register for the workshop, please send an email to caadria2017@gmail.com with the subject “workshop 5 sign-up”.

Workshop six

Weaving Structure and Interactive Space

1-3 April, with one coordination meeting at 5pm 1 April

Tutors

Weixin Huang (Tsinghua University), Teng-Wen Chang (National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Taiwan)

Influenced by architects such as Zaha Hadid and Frank Gehry, a lot of contemporary architectural designs employ great deal of digital technologies, and explore complex spatial expression and construction of organic curvilinear forms. Despite large amounts of effort that is dedicated into study and optimization of such design, its construction is still expensive. Inspired by traditional handicrafts, we propose a new mesh-like weaving structure that is constructed by continuous elastic members such as bamboo or FRP rods, which can bear bending forces. The advantage of the weaving structure system lies in its formal representation, structural performance and construction method. Firstly, mesh model is a common way to represent complex topology, and can be easily transformed into a weaving structure. Thus, the system can adapt to a wide range of forms. Secondly, the final form is a balance of bending forces inside the continuous elastic rods, thus is “organic” in its mechanism, rather than only looks organic. Thirdly, the form finding process makes the structure an evenly stressed and integrated one. Fourthly, materials for the weaving structure are accessible and easy to process. Further the structure can be constructed without tedious 3D positioning works, which is far more convenient than previous construction methods for curved surfaces.

A large-scale weaving structure installation is proposed to be constructed in the XJTLU campus by the tutors and participants. The installation could be interior or exterior, with LED lighting controlled by interactive sensors and Arduino system that could redefine the space. Interactive mechanical system is also proposed to enhance the interaction of the installation and people. Since the weaving structure system can be constructed without complex 3D fabrication and positioning work, the structure can be constructed within two days.

Participation requirements

Knowledge of Rhino and Grasshopper, elementary construction experiences preferred. Interest in Arduino system.

Software requirements for working on own laptop

Participants should have the latest Rhino 5 and Grasshopper versions installed.

Maximum of 15 participants.

To register for the workshop, please send an email to caadria2017@gmail.com with the subject “workshop 6 sign-up”.