IBSS research seminar series features world-leading economist

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The IBSS Research Seminar Series recently featured world-leading economist, Professor Chew Soo Hong, as the guest speaker. This seminar attracted IBSS staff and students.

Professor Chew is a fellow of the Econometric Society and currently Professor of Economics and Provost's Chair of the Department of Economics at National University of Singapore.

Professor Chew’s talk was entitled “Familiarity breeds investment if you have the right gene: A gene-brain-behavior study of familiarity bias in financial decision making”.

It discussed several experimental studies related to ambiguity aversion and familiarity bias using molecular genetics and neuro-imaging, establishing a gene-brain-behavior link for a decision-making disposition that may influence financial investment behaviour.

Dr Nimesh Salike, Head of Economics Group, said: “We really appreciated Professor Chew’s visit. His talk was definitely a highlight of the IBSS Research Seminar Series and brought us new thoughts to existing economic issues. We will always encourage more of such world-class academic exchange.”

Dr Yong Soo Keong, a lecturer in economics who invited and hosted Professor Chew, added: “Recent advancement in economic research has found evidence of specific genetic variants that can explain pro-social behavior such as generosity and kindness. And Professor Chew is one of the world pioneers that have made significant contribution in this field.”

IBSS Research Seminar Series is the principal regular research event at IBSS. Their aim is to provide academic staff and visiting scholars with an opportunity to share their research with colleagues and present on topics that will attract interest among the academic community at XJTLU.

The seminars are an integral part of the School's research culture, providing an opportunity to discuss ideas in an academic environment.

Previously, Professor Chew was the chair professor at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, professor of economics at the University of California, Irvine, the John Hopkins University, and the University of Arizona. He received his PhD from the University of British Columbia and his research interests include decision theory, behavioral and biological economics, and experimental economics. Professor Chew has published many top papers in both economic science journals and natural science journals.

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